GIMP BibleI’ve posted a few progress updates of this on Twitter, but for those of you who don’t follow that, I recently co-wrote a new book, GIMP Bible, due out in a couple weeks. The books left warehouses some time last week and Amazon says the release date is 1 March 2010 (that’s right, I’m not really sure what the exact release date is… I’m so well-informed), so that’s *really* soon. I’m actually a bit nervous about the book. It’s targeted at GIMP 2.8, which isn’t likely to be released until some time later this year. Fortunately, though, a lot of the content of the book works regardless of the version of GIMP you’re using, especially for things like GIMP Animation Package. In addition, part of the beauty of Free Software is that it’s developed out in the open, so you can actually download and play with development releases of GIMP (the 2.7 series) from gimp.org.

Speaking of websites, to go with the book, I’ve prepared a companion website with a whole heap of content – including images, GIMP files, and at least one python script – that you can use while going through the book. In the coming weeks, I’ll also be producing some video tutorials to accompany the book as well. You find all of that stuff on the companion site at www.gimpbible.com. Also, if you happen to stumble across an error in the book, send me a message and I’ll update an errata page for that chapter so everyone can stay up-to-date.

That’s about it… I’m pretty excited. This is my second book and it’s almost twice as long as my first. It was an intense project and I’m eager to find out what other folks think about it. Oh… also, I have to put out some big thanks on this book. Rob Shimonski, my co-author for GIMP Bible, did an incredible amount of work in a short period of time. I’m also honored that Melody Smith and Chris Hoyer provided me with a veritable library of photographs to use in my example figures throughout the book. Although you can see some of it on gimpbible.com, you really should check out their websites for examples of their excellent work. I also need to thank David Revoy, Tina Keller, and Rennett Stowe for the images of theirs that I also used in the book. Happy reading. Feedback welcome!

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